Glossary

Service Notices

No outages currently reported.
Please call if you have any issues.

Sonora (209) 588-9601
Groveland (209) 962-6373

 

Service Notices

 8   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 

E-Mail

It's hard to remember what our lives were like without e-mail. Ranking up there with the Web as one of the most useful features of the Internet, e-mail has become one of today's standard means of communication. Billions of messages are sent each year. If you're like most people these days, you probably have more than one e-mail address. After all, the more addresses you have, the more sophisticated you look...

E-mail is part of the standard TCP/IP set of protocols. Sending messages is typically done by SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) and receiving messages is handled by POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3), or IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol). IMAP is the newer protocol, allowing you to view and sort messages on the mail server, without downloading them to your hard drive.

Though e-mail was originally developed for sending simple text messages, it has become more robust in the last few years. Now, HTML-based e-mail can use the same code as Web pages to incorporate formatted text, colors, and images into the message. Also, documents can be attached to e-mail messages, allowing files to be transfered via the e-mail protocol. However, since e-mail was not originally designed to handle large file transfers, transferring large documents (over 3 MB, for example) is not allowed by most mail servers.

ECC

Stands for "Error Correction Code." ECC is used to verify data transmissions by locating and correcting transmission errors. It is commonly used by RAM chips that include forward error correction (FEC), which ensures all the data being sent to and from the RAM is transmitted correctly.

ECC RAM or memory is similar to parity RAM, which includes a parity bit that validates the data being sent. The parity bit is a redundant binary value of 1 or 0 that is sent along with the data. If the parity bit does not match the value of the data it represents, it indicates an error in the transmission and the data may need to be resent. ECC works in a similar way, but uses a more advanced error correction system that can correct data transmission errors on the fly.

Since ECC memory requires more processing, it can be slower than non-ECC RAM and basic parity RAM. However, ECC RAM provides more reliable data transfers, which results is greater system stability. Therefore, high-end servers and workstations may use ECC memory to minimize crashes and system downtime.

EIDE

EIDE is short for "Enhanced Integrated Drive Electronics" and is an improved version of the IDE drive controller standard. It is also referred to as "Fast ATA" or "ATA-2," which are technical names for the same technology. EIDE hard drives can transfer data up to 16.6 Mbps, which is twice as fast as the original IDE standard. While EIDE was widely used for many years it has since been replaced by newer ATA standards, including Serial ATA.

Emoticon

These are the little text-based faces and objects that you often see in e-mail and online chat. They help give the reader a sense of the writer's feelings behind the text. For example, the classic =) face shows that the writer is happy about something or that his message in good humor. The =P face is used to show frustration or to say "Whatever..." Emoticons can also be used to create real-world objects. For example, a @-→-→--- is supposed to be a long-stemmed rose, which you can use to show affection. Though I think most women would prefer a real long-stemmed rose if they had a choice.

Emulation

The term "emulation" comes from the verb "emulate," which means to imitate or reproduce. Therefore, computer emulation is when one system imitates or reproduces another system. This can be done using hardware, software, or a combination of the two. However, since hardware is expensive to reproduce, most emulation is done via software.

One of the most common types of software emulation involves running different operating systems in a virtual environment. For example, programs like Parallels Desktop, VMware, and Apple's Boot Camp allow Windows and other operating systems to run on an Intel-based Macintosh computer. Sun Microsystems' xVM VirtualBox allows multiple operating systems to be run on Windows, Mac, and Unix platforms. These applications are collectively referred to as software emulators, since they emulate different computer systems.

Another popular type of software emulation allows console video games, such as Nintendo, Sega, and PlayStation games, to be run on a PC. The program ZSNES, for example, allows Super Nintendo (SNES) games to be played on a Windows or Unix machine. The Virtual Boy Advance emulator allows users to play Game Boy Advance games on Windows or Macintosh computers. Games for these emulators are saved as ROM files, which are exact copies of a game cartridge or disk. Therefore, instead loading a physical cartridge, video game emulators simply load ROM files from the computer's hard drive.

A third type of emulation uses a type of file called a disk image. While ROM files are used to emulate game cartridges, disk images can be used to emulate optical media and physical hard disk. For example, an .ISO file (Windows) or .DMG file (Mac) can be mounted on the desktop, which makes the operating system view the file as a physical disk. This provides an easy way to make exact copies of CDs, DVDs, and hard disks. Disk images are also commonly used to create virtual installer disks that can't be modified by the user.

Encryption

Encryption is the coding or scrambling of information so that it can only be decoded and read by someone who has the correct decoding key. Encryption is used in secure Web sites as well as other mediums of data transfer. If a third party were to intercept the information you sent via an encrypted connection, they would not be able to read it. So if you are sending a message over the office network to your co-worker about how much you hate your job, your boss, and the whole dang company, it would be a good idea to make sure that you send it over an encrypted line.

EPS

Stands for "Encapsulated PostScript." EPS is a PostScript image file format that is compatible with PostScript printers and is often used for transferring files between various graphics applications. EPS files will print identically on all PostScript-compatible printers and will appear the same in all applications that can read the PostScript format.

As the name implies, EPS files contain PostScript code, which is used for storing font and vector image information. Vector images are usually drawings created by programs such as Adobe Illustrator and CorelDRAW. EPS files may also include a rasterized version of the image used for previewing the contents of the file.

Ethernet

The first syllable is pronounced "eath" as in "Heath Bar," not like "eth" as in Bethany. Ethernet is the most common type of connection computers use in a local area network (LAN). An Ethernet port looks much like a regular phone jack, but it is slightly wider. This port can be used to connect your computer to another computer, a local network, or an external DSL or cable modem.

Two widely-used forms of Ethernet are 10BaseT and 100BaseT. In a 10BaseT Ethernet connection, data transfer speeds can reach 10 mbps (megabits per second) through a copper cable. In a 100BaseT Ethernet connection, transfer speeds can get up to 100 mbps. There is also a technology called "Gigabit" Ethernet, where data transfer rates peak at 1000 mbps.

Exabyte

An exabyte is 2 to the 60th power, or 1,152,921,504,606,846,976 bytes.

It can be estimated as 10 to the 18th power, or 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes. An exabyte is 1,024 petabytes and precedes the zettabyte unit of measurement. While a 64-bit processor can theoretically use 16 exabytes of address space, exabytes are so large, the units are rarely used in a practical context. For example, it is estimated that all the printed material in the world only takes up about five exabytes.

Expansion Card

An expansion card is a printed circuit board that can be installed in computer to add functionality to it. For example, a user may add a new graphics card to his computer to give it more 3D graphics processing power. An audio engineer may add a professional sound card to his machine to increase the computer's audio input and output connections. Users that need more Firewire or USB ports can add Firewire or USB expansion cards, which provide additional connections.

Most expansion cards are installed in PCI slots. This includes variations of PCI, such as PCI-X and PCI Express. Graphics cards may also be installed in an AGP slot, which is designed specifically for video cards. Since expansion cards require open slots, they can only be installed in computers that have available expansion slots. Therefore, computers like the Apple iMac and other all-in-one machines cannot accept expansion cards. Computer towers, however, often have two or three open expansion slots, and can accept multiple cards.

Laptops don't use traditional expansion cards because of their small form factor. However, some models can accept removable PCMCIA cards that add extra ports or other functionality to the computer.

External Hard Drive

Nearly all personal computers come with an internal hard drive. This drive stores the computer's operating system, programs, and other files. For most users, the internal hard drive provides enough disk space to store all the programs and files. However, if the internal hard drive becomes full or if the user wants to back up the data on the internal hard drive, and external hard drive may be useful.

External hard drives typically have one of two interfaces - USB or Firewire. USB hard drives commonly use the USB 2.0 interface because it supports data transfer rates of up to 480 Mbps. USB 1.1 only supports transfers of up to 12 Mbps, which would make the hard drive seem slow to even the most patient people. Firewire drives may use either Firewire 400 or Firewire 800, which support data transfer rates of up to 400 and 800 Mbps respectively.

The most likely users to need external hard drives are those who do audio and video editing. This is because high-quality media files can fill up even the largest hard drives. Fortunately, external hard drives can be daisy chained, which means they can be connected one after the other and be used at the same time. This allows for virtually unlimited amounts storage.

Users who do not require extra storage may still find external hard drives useful for backing up their main hard drive. External hard drives are a great backup solution because they can store an exact copy of another hard drive and can be stored in a safe location. Using the drive to restore data or perform another backup is as simple as connecting it to the computer and dragging the necessary files from one drive to another.

While most external hard drives come in heavy, protective cases, some hard drives are designed primarily for portability. These drives usually don't hold as much data as their larger desktop counterparts, but they have a sleek form factor and can easily be transported with a laptop computer. Some portable drives also include security features such as fingerprint recognition that prevent other people from accessing data on the drive in case it is lost.

Extranet

If you know the difference between the Internet and an intranet, you have an above average understanding of computer terminology. If you know what an extranet is, you may be in the top echelon.

An extranet actually combines both the Internet and an intranet. It extends an intranet, or internal network, to other users over the Internet. Most extranets can be accessed via a Web interface using a Web browser. Since secure or confidential information is often accessible within an intranet, extranets typically require authentication for users to access them.

Extranets are often used by companies that need to share selective information with other businesses or individuals. For example, a supplier may use an extranet to provide inventory data to certain clients, while not making the information available to the general public. The extranet may also include a secure means of communication for the company and its clients, such as a support ticket system or Web-based forum.

Unlike the Internet, "extranet" is not a proper noun and therefore should not be capitalized.

SNC Location Map
Our Address:
16913 Amy Drive
Sonora, CA 95370
Mailing Address:
PO Box 281
Standard, CA 95373
Hours of Operation:
Mon. to Fri. 8am to 5:00pm

Tuolumne County Service Area: Cable TV, high speed internet, and VoIP telephone service areas include the Hwy 108 communities of Sonora, Columbia, Jamestown, Soulsbyville, Twain Harte, Strawberry, Longbarn, Cold Springs and Pinecrest, and the Hwy 120 communities of Big Oak Flat, Groveland, and Pine Mountain Lake. Not all services available everywhere

Customer Service

Sonora:
209-588-9601

Groveland:
209-962-6373

Online Support

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Proud member of:
Member of the Sierra Professional Association Member of TuCare